Mexican migrant day laborers return to their makeshift huts in the chaparral brushland on the edge of a northern San Diego County suburban town, in 2006, California, USA. Migrants must keep a low profile.  Even though Southern California has a moderate climate, winter nights can be quite cold in a makeshift shelter.
 Migrant farm worker's feet sitting before his makeshift house, in 2006, in a remote canyon beside agricultural fields in rural northern San Diego County, California, USA.
 Migrants from Southern Mexico or Central America signal a desire for manual work while they wait in front of a petrol station in Rancho Bernardo, California, USA in 2006.  Once successful in crossing into the United States, many migrants occupy street corners where motorists will stop and offered them day work in the garden or their homes.  These migrants are in San Diego County, California. 
 Undocumented Mexican migrants' shanties in the chaparral in 1987 in fields where the new suburban neighborhoods were encroaching upon agricultural land.  Rancho Peñasquitos, San Diego, California, USA.  These shacks, tucked out of line of sight in the open, offered scant shelter from winter rains and cold winter nights, where nights in the low 40's to high 30's (below 5C) were not uncommon.
 Mexican migrants lived in the fallow fields  and chaparral near Rancho Peñasquitos, San Diego, California in 1987.  Northern San Diego County was in a multi-decade long transformation from agriculture that employed most-Mexican migrant agricultural workers, lived on the edges of expanding suburban neighborhoods in shanties like this one.  Fearing US Border Patrol and unable to afford proper housing, they would live out of sight in the fields and rode rickety bicycles to the closest supermarket to buy mostly canned food due to lack of refrigeration.  Now most of these fields are occupied by upscale suburban housing complexes.
 Mexican migrants, mostly from the states of Michoacan and Guerrero, line up on a Sunday morning after a Catholic service in 1987 for a free meal provided by the local Catholic Church in the fallow fields and chaparral on the edge of the rapidly-expanding suburban communities of San Diego.  Rancho Peñasquitos, San Diego, California, USA.
 Migrants line up waiting to start a Catholic service, conducted by a local priest, in the fallow fields near Rancho Peñasquitos, San Diego, California in 1987.
 Mexican migrant woman cleans suburban American home in 2006, California, USA. Many American families use migrant labor, documented and undocumented, to help with cleaning the interiors of their homes.
 Undocumented Mexican men carry bags of food bought for them by the local Catholic Church in 1987.  They have just attended an open air Catholic service in the fallow fields at the edge of expanding housing developments, where they have set up a shanty town hoping to find work doing menial jobs for suburban families.  Rancho Peñasquitos, San Diego, California, USA.
 Migrant farm worker shows off tattoo of quetzel, a sacred bird in Central America and the national bird of Guatemala, in Indio, California in the early 1990's.
 Migrant Mexican workers help with celery harvest, Oxnard, California, USA in the early 1990's. 
 Migrants, mostly from the Mexican state of Guerrero, lived in the fallow fields, chaparral and canyons near Rancho Peñasquitos, San Diego, California in 2006.  Northern San Diego County was in a multi-decade long transformation from agriculture that employed most-Mexican migrant agricultural workers, lived on the edges of expanding suburban neighborhoods, share a meal in a makeshift shelter. 
 Migrant farm workers from the Mexican state of Guerrero relax in front of one of their makeshift homes, in 2006, erected in a remote canyon beside fields in northern San Diego County, California, USA.  
 Young undocumented men from Mexico share wary glances in the presence of an American stranger in the fallow fields on the edge of the suburban community of Rancho Rancho Peñasquitos, San Diego, California in 1987. 
 Tractor trailor passes through the wide expanse of the Imperial Sanddunes (Dunas Algodones in Spanish) very close to the US-Mexican border, Imperial County, California, USA in 2007.  In 2007, human and drug traffickers, from south of the border, would mix in with off roaders, which are common in these dunes to slip into the United States.
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